EA is the Bane of the Autocratic CIO

I was browsing through Gartner the other day looking for EA metrics and I stumbled across this fantastic tidbit: A strong CIO who firmly controls organization-wide IT issues and who establishes clear strategies for moving IT forward will be greatly aided by EA. Such a CIO will find that enterprise architecture provides the information he or she needs for important policy decisions, helps establish the organizational structures for processes that enforce those policies, and defines the metrics by which those policies are measured. And unfortunately I saw the wisdom of this quote as through the back side of a mirror. ... more ...

Managing vs Meeting Expectations

Have you ever been on a project and heard the expression "managing expectations"? This is usually a phrase that is bandied about along with "pie in the sky" and "designing the Rolls Royce". This is the expression I hear most often when a project is realizing that what the client wants...what the client expects... can't be done. And so they set out to manage expectations. In my book, that's failure, and I'd like to explain why. 'E' is for Emotion When you start out to change a business, you think about the capabilities that the business needs to ... more ...

In the name of efficiency

When you think about efficiency I'm guessing you think about savings: cost savings, time savings, overall improvements in delivery.  More and more, efficiency has come to mean environmental efficiency: less CO2, less water, less travel, less mining, more recycling.  Sometimes efficiency means getting a job done with the least amount of questions, interruptions or changes.  But if anything is clear to me, its that efficiency is not the same to all people in every situation. This concept is the key to viewpoints in enterprise architecture.  The data is the data, it remains what it is capturing ... more ...

Separation of concerns vs Physical Segregation

aka Do I really need an App server If you've ever planned out an application I'm sure you've heard the term "n-tier".  The idea is to take the logical capabilities required in a system (i.e. presentation, business logic and data management) and distribute them physically across a number of servers.The classic Microsoft diagram looks like this:There are a couple of guidances from MS about how to deploy these logical tiers, but they fundamentally resolve into distributed and non-distributed models:Non-distributedDistributedThe argument put forward by the experts is:> Because all of your layers share resources, one layer can ... more ...